#THEPOOLREADS

This week we’re reading...

#THEPOOLREADS

This week we’re reading...

Ta-Nehisi Coates's We Were Eight Years In Power, psychological thriller Pull Me Under and Alan Hollinghurst's breathtaking The Sparsholt Affair

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Ta-Nehisi Coates's We Were Eight Years In Power, psychological thriller Pull Me Under and Alan Hollinghurst's breathtaking The Sparsholt Affair

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  • Kuba Shand-Baptiste is reading… We Were Eight Years in Power by Ta-NEhisi Coates

    White, liberal America may too readily rely on Ta-Nehisi Coates as the only voice worth listening to on blackness in the US, but what's undeniable underneath the hype, is the combined strength and growth of his writing since emerging as a race discourse darling. We Were Eight Years In Power, a selection of Coates's articles on society's understanding of race and the black community in the run up to and throughout Barack Obama's presidency, is refreshingly honest, if a little hard to read in light of the current political landscape. Coates's willingness to ruminate on his flaws as a writer also inadvertently eased my ever-present imposter syndrome, which was pretty nice. 
    • BUY We Were Eight Years in Power on Amazon or pop into your local bookshop.

  • Hannah Varrall is reading… Pull Me Under by Kelly Luce.

    I'm not usually drawn to psychological thrillers but this book has a bit of everything – drama, death, relationships, and of course a murder. The protagonist, Rio, was born in Japan and moved to America after a difficult childhood. When her father dies, she has to return to Japan and come to terms with the parts of her life which she has kept hidden from herself, as well as her husband and child back in LA. It's one of those books which keeps surprising you, and makes you want to keep reading at every turn.
    • BUY Pull Me Under on Amazon or pop into your local bookshop.

  • Daisy Buchanan is reading… The Disaster Artist by Greg Sister and Tom Bissell

    I’ve just finished this memoir/biography of Tommy Wiseau and The Room, the 2003 film which has been described as "the Citizen Kane of bad films". Anyone who has seen The Room (and if you haven't, do, I don't think anything has ever made me laugh so hard) will have many questions about how something so shockingly bad could come into being - this book answers most of them. It's a fascinating outsider's insight into Hollywood, and it's strangely inspiring - it's a story about one man's peculiar dream coming true, against all conceivable odds. It's very funny, candid and surprisingly touching.
    • BUY The Disaster Artist on Amazon or pop into your local bookshop.

  • Caroline O’Donoghue is reading… Strangers On A Train by Patricia Highsmith

    I'm not usually a quick reader, but I devoured Strangers On A Train. It's Patricia Highsmith's first book – written at 29, no less – and it's so easy to tell why she's as big a legend as she is. The intense claustrophobia, the ugliness of obsession, the bleak, fatalistic lives of her characters: after taking a long time to get around to Highsmith, I now feel like a superfan.
    • BUY Strangers On A Train on Amazon or pop into your local bookshop.

  • Sam is reading… The Sparsholt Affair by Alan Hollinghurst

    No two ways about it, David Sparsholt is hot. When he arrives at Oxford in the autumn of 1940, everyone fancies him – but none more so than lonely novelist’s son Evert Dax. It is the start of something – can’t tell you what – that will colour the lives of Sparsholts for generations to come. Less a single novel than a series of intertwining novellas, some decades apart, The Sparsholt Affair is notable more for what it doesn’t show you than what it does. And as ever, Hollinghurst’s writing is breathtakingly beautiful.
    • BUY The Sparsholt Affair on Amazon or pop into your local bookshop.

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