#THEPOOLREADS

This week we're reading...

#THEPOOLREADS

This week we're reading...

A Margaret Atwood classic, an Instagram illustrators' hilarious take on 21st century womanhood, beat poets, a George Orwell essay collection and the third instalment in the Field series

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A Margaret Atwood classic, an Instagram illustrators' hilarious take on 21st century womanhood, beat poets, a George Orwell essay collection and the third instalment in the Field series

Posted

  • Rachael Sigee is reading… Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood

    Almost unforgivably, it has taken me until now to read Alias Grace. But it was just the novel to carry me from a despondent 2017 into a new year, with new potential. Atwood's treatment of the celebrated murderess is deliciously designed to wrongfoot the reader and, while it might be set in 1843, the themes of immigration, the treatment of women, mental illness, an unstable political climate and class divisions are as pertinent now as in Victorian Canada.​​
    • BUY Alias Grace on Amazon or pop into your local bookshop.

  • Lauren Bravo is reading… Literally Me by Julie Houts

    For Christmas, my brother gave me Literally Me by "Instagram's favourite illustrator", Julie Houts AKA @jooleeloren. It's a gloriously dark, hysterical and sometimes surreal mish-mash of cartoons, essays, scribbled notes and stories; from social anxiety and the challenges of wearing a jacket on one's shoulders, to imagining what would happen if Kylie Jenner had an existential crisis and could no longer "step out". Houts specialises in holding a mirror up to the most absurd aspects of 21st century womanhood, and nothing is sacred under her gaze. If you ever feel fatigued by the inspirational, unicorn-riddled #blessedness of your social feeds, this book is the antidote.  
    ​​• BUY Literally Me on Amazon or pop into your local bookshop.

  • Deborah Castle is reading… Boundary (Field Book 3) by Simon Winstanley

    I came across the Field series on a Kindle browse one bedtime. As a life-long sci-fi reader, I've become a bit picky on fictional visions of the future. The Field series has a dystopian, classic end-of-the-world theme (the moon is destroyed and crashes into the planet), and mankind is reduced to a few scientists and military protected by a spherical field within which time is slowed down. There's a good conspiracy plot line and colourful characters: a hero scientist and his daughter trying to save mankind, a billionaire villain, a mad scientist, and a terrorist religious faction. There is a rumour of a further book four, so the adventure will continue.
    ​​• BUY Boundary on Amazon or pop into your local bookshop.

  • Caroline O’Donoghue is reading… Books v. Cigarettes by George Orwell

    The ultimate handbag book: it's tiny, every essay lasts about as long as an 11 minute train ride, and, despite being written in 1946, it's still completely relevant. George Orwell is one of those people who wrote with such easy wit and perfect clarity that he's never going to fall out of fashion.
    ​​• BUY Books V. Cigarettes on Amazon or pop into your local bookshop.

  • Zoe Beaty is reading... Beat Poets

    Inspired by a little trip to the Barbican’s exhibition on Basquiat (which, as a side note, is well worth a visit), I picked up a pocket anthology of Beat Poets this weekend. The collection – built on a bed of Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg – is an unruly, untameable, warts-and-all snapshot of the avant garde, post-war movement that refused to conform. I’m only just beginning the collection, but already the social and political dissidence feels quite palpable – and eerily relevant, almost 70 years after the bulk of it was written.  the bulk of it was written.                                               • BUY Beat Poets on Amazon or pop into your local bookshop.

     

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